Talk about Grief (It Will Be Messy)

I’ve posted recently about some of the dysfunctional ways we respond to grief and loss, such as asking “How are you?” with the expectation of a brief and positive answer and measuring and scoring grief. Ira Glass notes in the first segment of the recent This American Life show devoted to grief that because ofContinue reading “Talk about Grief (It Will Be Messy)”

Measuring, Scoring, + Ranking Grief

Neoliberalism tends to boil everything down to a number at some level. We measure, we compare, we assess, we score, we set SMART goals. We have all sorts of platitudes about how beneficial this quantification is: what gets measured gets improved, without goals we’ll never grow, how can you know you’re doing better now ifContinue reading “Measuring, Scoring, + Ranking Grief”

Company/Organizational Policies and Not Being a Jerk

When I became Writing Center Director in 2008, I was amazed by the high number of “no shows” – that is, students who didn’t show up for their appointments. I worked with the staff to put some practices into place, such as calling students to remind them of their appointments the day before, to reduceContinue reading “Company/Organizational Policies and Not Being a Jerk”

Grieving in the Workplace (and Beyond): The Dreaded Question, “How Are You?”

My amazing husband, Tom DeBlaker, passed away on June 19. I’ve written in this blog about becoming his caregiver after his stroke. Now I am navigating being a widow. One of the toughest aspects of grieving is being asked an innocent and well-intended question: “How are you?” I know no one asks this question maliciously.Continue reading “Grieving in the Workplace (and Beyond): The Dreaded Question, “How Are You?””

Caregiving and Being Unprofessional

My husband has a major surgery this morning. The surgery itself is scary and the recovery will be long and painful. He needs this surgery because of a brain infection. We are not looking forward to it and we’re not sure how long and how painful the recovery will be, only that it will certainlyContinue reading “Caregiving and Being Unprofessional”

Starting Points for Learning More about Disability and Accessibility

This week and next week my posts will be a little shorter than usual because of two activities that can take up a lot of time and energy for disabled folks and their caregivers: (1) arguing with doctors and insurance companies and (2) undergoing medical treatment. This week arguing is the big activity and nextContinue reading “Starting Points for Learning More about Disability and Accessibility”

Whose Knowledge of Disability Has Value?

Last week I chronicled the five-year process I had to go through to get medical documentation of my disability. I mentioned that I was dumbfounded that after going to my main eye doctor for a few years and finally throwing a fit, he mentioned that his practice had a low vision specialist that he couldContinue reading “Whose Knowledge of Disability Has Value?”

How Hard Is It To Get Documentation of a Disability?

I’ve previously blogged about the access fatigue that comes along with asking for accommodations. At my institution—and most others—students cannot ask for accommodations unless they are formally registered as having a disability with their campus disability services office. Similarly, faculty and staff cannot ask for accommodations unless they are formally registered as having a disabilityContinue reading “How Hard Is It To Get Documentation of a Disability?”

8 Things You Can Do to Make Your Workplace or Class More Accessible

Because disability is not stable, making a workplace or a classroom accessible is not a “one and done” endeavor. The concept of “accommodations” certainly implies that accessibility is about making one or two tweaks to an environment and then moving on, but that idea is based on an ableist idea of disability as stable. HereContinue reading “8 Things You Can Do to Make Your Workplace or Class More Accessible”

Identifying Accommodations Is Harder than You Think

I’ve previously blogged about the access fatigue that comes along with asking for accommodations. Before you can even ask for accommodations, though, you need to know what to ask for, and that’s more difficult than it may seem. With my low vision, for example, it may seem obvious that I need good lighting, but whatContinue reading “Identifying Accommodations Is Harder than You Think”